Stimulate me.

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Stimulate me. Hai, I'm Tysha. Twenty something.
Just to put this short & sweet, this blog is an honest extension of myself. So yeah~
/PS: If the post is not cited then it is mine.
travel-as-a-happy-hippie:

~Let’s chill in my Hippie Van~

travel-as-a-happy-hippie:

~Let’s chill in my Hippie Van~

(Source: Flickr / markuspouch, via nnaffettss)

NEED

NEED

(via miss--bloom)

I’m baaack!

Just got out of RTC and am currently on a flight to Fort SH. So exciting! Über nervous but I think I can manage. I want nothing but the best for myself and will feel a certain way if in case I don’t get it as I had pic.

Water Lilies, Claude Monet, part III.

(Source: marieantoinete, via vintagegal)

Threw up last night from the anxiety about leaving them all. The same anxiety that i have thinking about how much my life will change.

Or food poisoning from that weird Kumos. That drink I made also possssiblely made me do it.

I just love them so much.

magicblood:

going to school looking like

image

getting out of school looking like

image

(via sackofshitt)

scienceyoucanlove:

femscinerd:

ferr0uswheel:

nprglobalhealth:

You can really see how the anti-vaccine movement drove measles and whooping cough outbreaks in Europe and the U.S. over the past few years. Vaccines work, people! Why not use them?

skunkbear:

These are the disease outbreaks that could have been prevented by proper vaccination according to the Council on Foreign Relations. You can explore the interactive map here.

Check out the thousands of whooping cough cases in the United States in 2011 and the measles outbreaks plaguing Europe.

Viruses, though they are not alive, have genetic material that allows it to evolve. So even if people got the vaccines, something like an outbreak might happen anyway, just a different strain.

I’m not exactly sure what you’re getting at, but that’s a big generalization for an extremely complex problem.  Vaccines work by teaching the body to recognize specific parts of a pathogen (called an epitope).  In many cases, these epitopes are fairly conserved across all strains of a pathogen*, usually because they are critical for infection.  The vaccines for pathogens which have some variation—like polio—contain antigens for multiple serotypes.  The likelihood that a situation like you describe will occur—that the viruses listed in the infographic will simply evolve so the vaccine is no longer effective, causing a massive outbreak, is basically nonexistent.  If all viruses could simply evolve beyond vaccine-induced immunity, we wouldn’t see the long-term (60+ years in the case of polio) protection that we do and scientists certainly wouldn’t regard a vaccine as the “holy grail” for disease treatment.  So please get vaccinated!

*There are viruses (and bacteria) that are able to vary surface epitopes to such a high degree that effective vaccination has so far been elusive.  Obvious examples include HIV and N. meningitidis (for which only some of the strains can be vaccinated against).

^ THANK YOU so much for saying that! I literally just had a sit down talk with a woman seriously concerned about vaccinating her son :p

thatfunnyblog:

Shit talking in an intelligent manner.

(Source: cliffpantones, via fresherwithlesseffort)

antiqueart:

aa - birth and death (2013)

antiqueart:

aa - birth and death (2013)

(via seindasein)

kierabadu:

Me @ life

kierabadu:

Me @ life

(Source: suppermariobroth, via followmeslut)

c0ssette:

Emile Vernon,La printemps,1913,detail..

c0ssette:

Emile Vernon,La printemps,1913,detail..

(via vintagegal)

amnhnyc:

Happy Birthday, Charles Darwin!
The English naturalist was born February 12, 1809, and five decades later he published On the Origin of Species. Prompted by an article by Alfred Russel Wallace published in 1858, Darwin’s book introduced readers to an idea that would revolutionize human life as we understand it: the theory of evolution by natural selection.
Here are a few spots to learn more about Darwin’s life, scientific pursuits, and the continued influence of the theory of evolution by natural selection.

amnhnyc:

Happy Birthday, Charles Darwin!

The English naturalist was born February 12, 1809, and five decades later he published On the Origin of Species. Prompted by an article by Alfred Russel Wallace published in 1858, Darwin’s book introduced readers to an idea that would revolutionize human life as we understand it: the theory of evolution by natural selection.

Here are a few spots to learn more about Darwin’s life, scientific pursuits, and the continued influence of the theory of evolution by natural selection.

(Source: smutbookclub, via dailycuteboy)